Company The Dog Dog Created at Jim Henson Creatures Shop introduces into Dementia Therapy

Company The Dog Dog Created at Jim Henson Creatures Shop introduces into Dementia Therapy

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A new company in California created what it says is a revolutionary way to allow dementia patients to love pets and love it without day care demands.

It may be difficult to care for a pet if it is impossible for older people suffering from Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, as did Tom Stevens founder Tombot, and his own mother when diagnosed with Alzheimer's eight. years ago.

“Of all the bad days, the worst thing was the day I had to take his dog away,” Stevens said. As her mother's condition deteriorated and her friends and activities suffered, her dog “Golden Bear” became an increasingly important companion to deal with her loss of independence. The turning point came when she managed to train the golden doodle two years to be aggressive towards her carer.

Tombot CEO and founder, mother of Tom Stevens, Nancy, with Tombot a son.

(Photo courtesy of Tombot)

Stevens said he spent 35 years in the technology industry. In fact it was not long after his mother's diagnosis that he left the company – ACT Litigation Services, Inc., now owned by DiscoverReady LLC – that he started working as a partner in 1984. The company provides electronic discovery, document review and litigation management consulting services for legal firms and Fortune 100 corporations.

“I started looking for representatives of the dog,” he said. “And I wondered if there was a higher technology that could play a role.” He discovered, and what helped, Jim Henson's world-famous Creatures Shop, Tombot, a robotic companion animal designed to be a truly viable dog option for adults with dementia, older people and anyone who does not have a live pet.

He said that he thought his mother was not unique when the pet's heart broke. “I knew that other people got comfort from animals but that they could no longer care for them. Studies have shown that robotic animal companions can reduce the need for psychotropic and anti-copper tires by helping to reduce dementia behavior, ”he said. “Tombot's robotic cuckoo can be an invaluable tool to increase social participation in older people, and to divert challenging behaviors.” T

But Stevens said that he had studied the options already available in relation to little-used mechanical toys. He stated that he had received products costing more than $ 2,000 or less than $ 200, neither of which could satisfy his mother's needs. The cheapest ones are mechanical toys, he said. “These are very simple and adorable devices,” he said, “but they are toys. They look like toys. They act like toys. They all relate to cost reduction and external appearance. They are usually made with two motors. The toy industry has a problem selling products over $ 100. So, their products are in the range of $ 25 to $ 75 that. ”

So, to solve his problem, Stevens set up what he says is the “high robot on the market that is also affordable.” T

“We are the only product between these prices, too too robot. It is the most realistic and affordable robotic animal in the world. A toy is nothing less expensive, ”he said. “We needed to compose a much more realistic robotic animal than it was before, and be affordable to get as many people as possible.” T

And that's what he did. Stevens is currently in a position to make pre-orders for production three months. The funding came from its Kickstarter campaign which ran for 30 days between April and May. These orders, at around $ 450 per unit, are to be made available in May 2020. He said he will start taking orders later this year.

And while the price point is where it needs it, the real difference will be seen by the owner. “The difference between the lengths we went to be the real robot,” he said. “Looks and feels and feels like a real animal.” Remember the toys with two motors? In comparison, Stevens said that his prototype is 16. “The difference is in the sophistication of technology.”

Not only would Stevens put his high-tech expert to work on his idea, but he used Hollywood's top-animation experts at the world-renowned Jim Henson Pottery Shop to realize the realism he believed he needed for his robot. . The team at the Crete Shop provided the art design services for Tombot robotic roosts. An interview with the Crew Shop team is available here.

Using their award-winning animatronics skills at the Academy, James Creator Shop took Jamesns' vision, creating a “big screen” Labrador puppy, and the Tombot robotics team took the puppy through control systems. compose software. a series of sensors to make the puppy autonomous and fully interactive. “The result is a beautiful, enjoyable puppy with overlapping sentences and behavior, corresponding to vocal commands, with enough battery power to spend a day, and with a more affordable price than the next robot. on the market, ”Stevens said. There are now patents on the design and architecture of Tombot.

Tombot curtains are designed to be effective representatives for live animal companions, so Stevens offers all the benefits of a live animal available without the burden of care, the risk of grip, allergic reactions or infections t .

Features of Madrín Tombot include:

  • Realistic appearance: User-friendly design that is true to the real dog anatomy.
  • Productions and Lifelike Transportation: A software control system that allows the robot to respond to users in a way that is consistent with how real dog responds.
  • Reply to Voice Orders: A voice recognition system that listens to and responds to commands.
  • Easy to Charge: All day battery life provides a chord that deals with charges overnight.

Stevens said he had only engaged design and robotics experts to build a robot. “Tombot is the result of extensive research and various rounds of consumer testing,” he said. “Puppy Tombot is an attractive companion who can provide heart commitment, helping to alleviate loneliness and reduce anxiety.” T

Scientists estimate that over 90% of people with dementia develop at least one behavioral or psychological symptom (BPSD). “The symptoms include loneliness, depression, anxiety, and motherhood, hallucinations,” he said. “Doctors then prescribe anti-psychotics. Not only does this change to zombies, but there is also a health risk. “And studies have shown that these symptoms can be reduced if they can make an emotional connection, especially with something like a person's baby doll or mechanical animal. They get relief from the symptoms and the corresponding need for psychotropic medications goes down. ”

Stevens said that his companion can provide robotic animals with a stronger sense of control, connectivity and purpose, and subsequently reduce their symptoms as well as the need for psychotropic medications.

Stevens said after a number of consumer testing rounds with groups of up to 700 seniors who had Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, the Tombot team decided that “a robotic animal had the highest potential for appearance, feeling and behavior too realistic to nurture emotion. connection with older people suffering from these dissolved diseases, ”said Stevens.

In the mic-analysis of 19 studies published last week in the International Journal of Nursing Older PeopleResearchers from the University of Exeter, UK, found, “For those who choose to tackle them, ropes have the potential to reduce loneliness and unrest, increase social interactions, and provide comfort and pleasure. however, add the caveat that not everyone tackles bots, and for those who do, “Interactions are very different and the personal history and nature and characteristics of the rope have an impact.”

Researchers continued to say that the best use of ropes training can help improve resident participation and staff confidence in their use, and while robots should not be considered to be in place. human interaction, there seems to be scope for them to be used as therapy for deceased or remote residents. ”

After looking after his own mother for eight years, Stevens said that he understands the importance of improving overall behavior, attitudes and welfare for those suffering with BPSD. And it's not the only one. Tombot recently completed the Kickstarter campaign to raise awareness of consumers and the investment community about Puppy Tombot. Approximately 233 backups promised $ 60,336 to bring Tombot to life. “Almost all Tombot investors have dementia relationships,” he said. “Through these interactions, we realize that the benefits we are delivering are not just for older people with dementia, but also for those who are most responsible for their ongoing care and well-being.”

One of the things Stevens said was that his team learned in their research with the neurology of the emotional connection. The neutral pathways put in place to stimulate the production of detector-like chemicals such as oxytocin in our brain are the same for most emotional attachments, including mother and child, mother and adoptive and human and pet children.

“We realized that what we created had to encourage those emotional pathways,” he said.

His second course of study was to understand the choices older people had with dementia, he said. “We learned that they have a very strong choice towards realism compared to a toy or cartoon or abstract. About 20% of its predefined Tombot rabbits are going to children who may have autism or are too young to have pets. “The demand is great,” he said. “The response was not too unusual.”

Stevens also said that he tried to address some of the things that some of them see as an ethical problem involving “misleading the person.” But he said that the individuals in their studies realized that the prototype was even a robot. “They really like being a robot because there are memories of previous pets and the burden of care and concern for looking after the animal,” Stevens said. “They may have attachments to deceased animals and a robot doesn't threaten it.” T

Stevens said he is using “upgraded software” so that owners can expand and improve their animal behavior. And while he is currently, Tombot is considered a “fitness device,” he said he is working on getting FDA approval so that private insurance and Medicare pay the robots for people who need them.

Stevens said 100% of his initial investors were “people whose families were affected by a family member with Alzheimer's disease. We were not looking for that, but those people came forward. There is no venture capital or no anonymous donors. We know who the investors are, and they are as close as we are. Basically, there were thousands of volunteers to help us from doctors to hospitals to carers. I apply these messages every day. ”

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A new company in California created what it says is a revolutionary way to allow dementia patients to love pets and love it without day care demands.

It may be difficult to care for a pet if it is impossible for older people suffering from Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, as did Tom Stevens founder Tombot, and his own mother when diagnosed with Alzheimer's eight. years ago.

“Of all the bad days, the worst thing was the day I had to take his dog away,” Stevens said. As her mother's condition deteriorated and her friends and activities suffered, her dog “Golden Bear” became an increasingly important companion to deal with her loss of independence. The turning point came when she managed to train the golden doodle two years to be aggressive towards her carer.

Tombot CEO and founder, mother of Tom Stevens, Nancy, with Tombot a son.

(Photo courtesy of Tombot)

Stevens said he spent 35 years in the technology industry. In fact it was not long after his mother's diagnosis that he left the company – ACT Litigation Services, Inc., now owned by DiscoverReady LLC – that he started working as a partner in 1984. The company provides electronic discovery, document review and litigation management consulting services for legal firms and Fortune 100 corporations.

“I started looking for representatives of the dog,” he said. “And I wondered if there was a higher technology that could play a role.” He discovered, and what helped, Jim Henson's world-famous Creatures Shop, Tombot, a robotic companion animal designed to be a truly viable dog option for adults with dementia, older people and anyone who does not have a live pet.

He said that he thought his mother was not unique when the pet's heart broke. “I knew that other people got comfort from animals but that they could no longer care for them. Studies have shown that robotic animal companions can reduce the need for psychotropic and anti-copper tires by helping to reduce dementia behavior, ”he said. “Tombot's robotic cuckoo can be an invaluable tool to increase social participation in older people, and to divert challenging behaviors.” T

But Stevens said that he had studied the options already available in relation to little-used mechanical toys. He stated that he had received products costing more than $ 2,000 or less than $ 200, neither of which could satisfy his mother's needs. The cheapest ones are mechanical toys, he said. “These are very simple and adorable devices,” he said, “but they are toys. They look like toys. They act like toys. They all relate to cost reduction and external appearance. They are usually made with two motors. The toy industry has a problem selling products over $ 100. So, their products are in the range of $ 25 to $ 75 that. ”

So, to solve his problem, Stevens set up what he says is the “high robot on the market that is also affordable.” T

“We are the only product between these prices, too too robot. It is the most realistic and affordable robotic animal in the world. A toy is nothing less expensive, ”he said. “We needed to compose a much more realistic robotic animal than it was before, and be affordable to get as many people as possible.” T

And that's what he did. Stevens is currently in a position to make pre-orders for production three months. The funding came from its Kickstarter campaign which ran for 30 days between April and May. These orders, at around $ 450 per unit, are to be made available in May 2020. He said he will start taking orders later this year.

And while the price point is where it needs it, the real difference will be seen by the owner. “The difference between the lengths we went to be the real robot,” he said. “Looks and feels and feels like a real animal.” Remember the toys with two motors? In comparison, Stevens said that his prototype is 16. “The difference is in the sophistication of technology.”

Not only would Stevens put his high-tech expert to work on his idea, but he used Hollywood's top-animation experts at the world-renowned Jim Henson Pottery Shop to realize the realism he believed he needed for his robot. . The team at the Crete Shop provided the art design services for Tombot robotic roosts. An interview with the Crew Shop team is available here.

Using their award-winning animatronics skills at the Academy, James Creator Shop took Jamesns' vision, creating a “big screen” Labrador puppy, and the Tombot robotics team took the puppy through control systems. compose software. a series of sensors to make the puppy autonomous and fully interactive. “The result is a beautiful, enjoyable puppy with overlapping sentences and behavior, corresponding to vocal commands, with enough battery power to spend a day, and with a more affordable price than the next robot. on the market, ”Stevens said. There are now patents on the design and architecture of Tombot.

Tombot curtains are designed to be effective representatives for live animal companions, so Stevens offers all the benefits of a live animal available without the burden of care, the risk of grip, allergic reactions or infections t .

Features of Madrín Tombot include:

  • Realistic appearance: User-friendly design that is true to the real dog anatomy.
  • Productions and Lifelike Transportation: A software control system that allows the robot to respond to users in a way that is consistent with how real dog responds.
  • Reply to Voice Orders: A voice recognition system that listens to and responds to commands.
  • Easy to Charge: All day battery life provides a chord that deals with charges overnight.

Stevens said he had only engaged design and robotics experts to build a robot. “Tombot is the result of extensive research and various rounds of consumer testing,” he said. “Puppy Tombot is an attractive companion who can provide heart commitment, helping to alleviate loneliness and reduce anxiety.” T

Scientists estimate that over 90% of people with dementia develop at least one behavioral or psychological symptom (BPSD). “The symptoms include loneliness, depression, anxiety, and motherhood, hallucinations,” he said. “Doctors then prescribe anti-psychotics. Not only does this change to zombies, but there is also a health risk. “And studies have shown that these symptoms can be reduced if they can make an emotional connection, especially with something like a person's baby doll or mechanical animal. They get relief from the symptoms and the corresponding need for psychotropic medications goes down. ”

Stevens said that his companion can provide robotic animals with a stronger sense of control, connectivity and purpose, and subsequently reduce their symptoms as well as the need for psychotropic medications.

Stevens said after a number of consumer testing rounds with groups of up to 700 seniors who had Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, the Tombot team decided that “a robotic animal had the highest potential for appearance, feeling and behavior too realistic to nurture emotion. connection with older people suffering from these dissolved diseases, ”said Stevens.

In the mic-analysis of 19 studies published last week in the International Journal of Nursing Older PeopleResearchers from the University of Exeter, UK, found, “For those who choose to tackle them, ropes have the potential to reduce loneliness and unrest, increase social interactions, and provide comfort and pleasure. however, add the caveat that not everyone tackles bots, and for those who do, “Interactions are very different and the personal history and nature and characteristics of the rope have an impact.”

Researchers continued to say that the best use of ropes training can help improve resident participation and staff confidence in their use, and while robots should not be considered to be in place. human interaction, there seems to be scope for them to be used as therapy for deceased or remote residents. ”

After looking after his own mother for eight years, Stevens said that he understands the importance of improving overall behavior, attitudes and welfare for those suffering with BPSD. And it's not the only one. Tombot recently completed the Kickstarter campaign to raise awareness of consumers and the investment community about Puppy Tombot. Approximately 233 backups promised $ 60,336 to bring Tombot to life. “Almost all Tombot investors have dementia relationships,” he said. “Through these interactions, we realize that the benefits we are delivering are not just for older people with dementia, but also for those who are most responsible for their ongoing care and well-being.”

One of the things Stevens said said his team learned in their research with the neurology of the emotional connection. The neutral pathways put in place to stimulate the production of detector-like chemicals such as oxytocin in our brain are the same for most emotional attachments, including mother and child, mother and adoptive and human and pet children.

“We realized that what we created had to encourage those emotional pathways,” he said.

His second course of study was to understand the choices older people had with dementia, he said. “We learned that they have a very strong choice towards realism compared to a toy or cartoon or abstract. About 20% of its predefined Tombot rabbits are going to children who may have autism or are too young to have pets. “The demand is great,” he said. “The response was not too unusual.”

Stevens also said that he tried to address some of the things that some of them see as an ethical problem involving “misleading the person.” But he said that the individuals in their studies realized that the prototype was even a robot. “They really like being a robot because there are memories of previous pets and the burden of care and concern for looking after the animal,” Stevens said. “They may have attachments to deceased animals and a robot doesn't threaten it.” T

Stevens said he is using “upgraded software” so that owners can expand and improve their animal behavior. And while he is currently, Tombot is considered a “fitness device,” he said he is working on getting FDA approval so that private insurance and Medicare pay the robots for people who need them.

Stevens said 100% of his initial investors were “people whose families were affected by a family member with Alzheimer's disease. We were not looking for that, but those people came forward. There is no venture capital or no anonymous donors. We know who the investors are, and they are as close as we are. Basically, there were thousands of volunteers to help us from doctors to hospitals to carers. I apply these messages every day. ”

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