Europe is starting to mess up! 80,000 people protest the cost of living in Brussels Can’t accept the impact of the Russian-Ukrainian war (watch the clip)

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Around 70,000 to 80,000 Belgian workers marched through Brussels. On Monday (June 20), the government urged the government to deal with the rising cost of living. Consequences of the Russian invasion of Ukraine during a one-day strike at Brussels airport and local transport networks across the country causing the public transport system to almost halt

The protesters waved flags and held banners. “Show more respect. Wage increases” and “excise tax cancellation”, some of which set off fireworks. Some have called on the government to take more action. The rest say employers need to increase wages and improve the working environment.

The trade unions said Some 80,000 people took part in the protest, but police put the figure at around 70,000.

Brussels Airport said it was unable to allow passenger flights to depart. Due to widespread protests covering personnel responsible for safety Most of the inbound flights were also cancelled.

On the other hand, local public transport companies continue to serve people. but in a very limited manner It includes trains on certain routes. in part to allow protesters to gather in the capital.

Belgium’s inflation rate hit 9% in June. reflecting the same high prices as other places It was largely the impact of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. towards the supply chain Energy prices and commodity prices

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Alexander de Gaure, Prime Minister of Belgium Claims that Belgian workers are better protected than workers in other EU member states. due to the increase in inflation compensation wages He also said the government had also cut the natural gas sales tax. electricity and fuel until the end of the year

However, the journey is expected to be hectic again at the end of the week. After the pilots and crew of Brussels Airlines planned to leave from June 23-25 ​​to protest about the working environment. The pilots and crew of Ryanair in Belgium are also planning a three-day protest starting Friday, June 24.

Russian news agency ART News Many protesters reportedly condemned the US-led NATO alliance. in relation to the conflict in Ukraine And many have linked their economic woes to EU sanctions imposed on Russia. including cases where NATO allies rush to deliver weapons to Ukraine

The protesters called on the leaders that “Put the money on the payroll, not the weapons”, shouting “Stop NATO”.

There have been protests across Europe recently. Against the high cost of living Among them included thousands of union members marched in London on Saturday (June 18), some blamed higher prices on NATO and its allies.

This parade It came just three months after a rally called for the EU to cut itself off its dependence. “Putin’s oil” plus a few weeks before that. There is also a gathering in front of the European Parliament building. Calls for tough sanctions against Russia

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Brussels, home to both the EU and NATO headquarters, was also the city chosen by US President Joe Biden to announce the launch of sanctions against Russia in March.

Despite the forecast in April That the measures “would wipe out Russia’s economic income for the last 15 years”, but the reality is that Russia’s energy income hit its highest level since February. And the ruble was the strongest in 7 years against the euro.

Russian President Vladimir Putin mocks countries in Europe that economic suicides are being carried out through sanctions. and predicted last week that These sanctions will directly cost the EU more than $400 billion a year.

(Source: Reuters/RT News)

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