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G20 pledges to take emergency measures to pave the way for the UN climate summit

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Original title: G20 will pledge to take emergency measures to pave the way for the United Nations climate summit

China News Service, October 30. According to Singapore’s Lianhe Zaobao, G20 leaders held talks in Rome on October 30 and 31. According to the draft, they promised to take emergency measures to control the increase in global temperature within 1.5 degrees Celsius.

According to a draft of the Group of Twenty (G20) communiqué obtained by Reuters, the G20 will have its summit in Italy to send a positive signal on climate change. They will pledge to address the existential threats posed by climate change and pave the way for more concrete actions at the UN Climate Change Summit next week.

Data map: International Media Center for the 13th Summit of the Group of Twenty (G20) Leaders.Photo by China News Agency reporter Sheng Jiapeng

The G20 leaders held talks in Rome for two consecutive days. According to the draft, they promised to take emergency measures to control the increase in global temperature within 1.5 degrees Celsius.

In the 2015 Paris Agreement, the contracting parties pledged to limit the global temperature rise to within 2 degrees Celsius higher than the pre-industrial level, and to limit the rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius as much as possible. Since then, due to the frequent occurrence of extreme weather events and the increase in carbon content in the atmosphere, climate scientists have increasingly emphasized the importance of the upper limit of 1.5 degrees Celsius in limiting the risk of environmental disasters.

The 11-page draft said that the G20 responded to the call of the scientific community and noted the shocking report issued by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It said: “Considering our leadership, we are committed to addressing the survival challenges of climate change… We also recognize that the impact of climate change at 1.5 degrees Celsius is much smaller than at 2 degrees Celsius, so we must act immediately. , To keep 1.5 degrees Celsius within the achievable range.”

The G20 stated that they understand the important relevance of achieving net zero global greenhouse gas emissions or carbon neutrality by 2050. However, the 2050 date is bracketed in the draft, indicating that negotiations are still pending.

In addition, the G20 reiterated its commitment to phase out subsidies for fossil fuels and stop using carbon energy in 2025. At the same time, it recognizes the importance of spending US$100 billion (approximately S$134 billion) every year to help other countries reduce emissions until 2025.

Although rich countries have pledged to help developing countries reduce emissions, but because these commitments have not been fully fulfilled, the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) Chairman Shama said this week that he hopes that these funds will be available in 2023, that is, than the original. The date set was three years late.

Bloomberg quoted some G20 officials to disclose that the current negotiations of the G20 are very slow, especially in the areas of climate and energy.

The G20 has a decisive impact on major global issues. Its members account for more than 80% of the global gross domestic product (GDP), and its population accounts for 60% of the world‘s total population. It is estimated that it accounts for 80% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

After the meeting, the leaders of the G20 member states will attend COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland. It is estimated that as many as 200 countries will participate in the conference.Return to Sohu to see more

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