More Positive Mosquitoes Testing for West Nile Virus in Orange and L Counties.

More Positive Mosquitoes Testing for West Nile Virus in Orange and L Counties.

New examples of mosquitos found in Los Angeles and Orange counties include positive examples for West Nile virus, bringing the total number of infection samples received this year to 140 in both counties, health officials said on Friday.

In Los Angeles, infected samples were found in Boleyboy and Whittier last week, raising the county up to 28 this year. Infected samples found in Anaheim, Buena Park, Fullerton and Stanton total Orange County 2019 up to 114.

The virus is transmitted to humans and animals by means of an infected mosquito bite, and is the main cause of mosquito-borne disease in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

At least 89 people have entered into a West Nile Contract in the state in September 2019. Four of the cases were in L.A. County, according to a report by the California Pig-borne Virus Surveillance and Response Program.

This graphic shows that the California Marine Virus Surveillance and Response program issued the number of people with a West Nile virus in each county across California on September 13, 2019.

This graphic shows that the California Marine Virus Surveillance and Response program issued the number of people with a West Nile virus in each county across California on September 13, 2019.

Californians die every year as a result of the contracting virus.

Two people died as a result of illnesses related to the West Nile in California in 2019. The first reported death was a man of Imperial County 74 years old and Fresno was 78 years d & # 39 the age of the latter.

Last year, 11 people died in West Nile in California, and 44 people died in the previous year, according to the report.

The Tustin woman in her 50s was diagnosed with West Nile virus fever in August 2019, being the first person to contract the virus in Orange County this year.

"Western Nile virus is endemic in Los Angeles County," said the Greater Los Angeles Vector Control District in news release.

The agency said the risk of contracting the virus increases as the temperatures rise and gives more mosquitos to California.

Most people who contract the virus have no symptoms, but may develop fever, headaches, body aches, nausea or skin rash, and symptoms can survive for months.

About 1 in 150 infected people develop a serious, fatal illness, according to health officials.

There are no vaccines to prevent the virus in humans, but residents can reduce the risk of contracting during the mosquito season by using insects and wearing long shirts when outdoors. .

Water left standing for more than a week in containers like flower pots, fountains and pet dishes, or in non-conserved pools, can be a breeding habitat for mosquitoes and should be thrown out, health officials said.

In an attempt to reduce the number of mosquitoes and limit the spread of viruses, Orange County health officials said they will be using cold fog machines to spray the mosquitoes in neighborhoods where infection samples were found.

Residents can check the spray schedule and find out where the infected samples were found online.

Residents of Los Angeles County can call 562-944-9656 for more information on the virus. Residents of Orange County can visit ocvector.org

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