Home Tech NVIDIA’s next-generation cloud gaming “GeForce Now RTX 3080” enables ultra-low latency streaming at 1440p / 120fps | TechCrunch Japan

NVIDIA’s next-generation cloud gaming “GeForce Now RTX 3080” enables ultra-low latency streaming at 1440p / 120fps | TechCrunch Japan

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NVIDIA announced the GeForce Now RTX 3080, a next-generation cloud gaming platform that delivers “desktop-class latency” and “1440p gaming at up to 120fps on a PC or Mac.” The service is offered by a new gaming supercomputer called the GeForce Now SuperPod, which costs twice as much as the current Priority.

According to NVIDIA, the SuperPod is “the most powerful gaming supercomputer ever made” with 39,200 TFLOPS, 11,477,760 CUDA cores and 8,960 CPU cores. The company says it will offer a 35TFLOPS, three times the Xbox Series X, or almost the same experience as a PC with an 8-core CPU, 28GB of DDR4-3200 RAM, and a PCI-GEN4 SSD.

Image credit: NVIDIA

So you can see 1440p gaming up to 120fps on Macs and PCs, and 4K HDR on SHIELD, but NVIDIA doesn’t mention the refresh rate of the latter. It also supports 120fps on mobile and “supports next-generation 120Hz displays,” NVIDIA said. In contrast, GeForce Now’s Priority level is limited to 1080p / 60fps, and Adaptive VSync is available in the latest updates.

In addition, tricks such as adaptive sync to reduce buffering have reduced the latency of “click-to-pixel” to 56ms, which is superior to other services and local dedicated PCs. However, this assumes a GeForce Now data center round-trip delay (RTD) of 15ms, which of course depends on your internet provider and location.

Aside from NVIDIA’s claim, it’s clearly faster than the current GeForce Priority level on both mobile devices and PCs. However, the speed comes with a cost. GeForce Now’s premium membership starts at $ 50 a year and has recently doubled to $ 100, which is already a fairly large demand. However, the RTX 3080 membership is “limited in quantity” for $ 100 for six months, with Founders and priority early access starting October 21st. It starts. That said, it’s cheaper than buying a new PC anyway.

Editor’s Note: This article first appeared on Engadget. Author Steve Dent is Engadget’s Associate Editor.

Image credit: NVIDIA

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(Sentence: Steve Dent, Translation: Aya Nakazato)

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