Persevia Rennes Explorer Samples of Martian rocks have been successfully collected.

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Persevia uses a rock drilling rig mounted on the forearm of a mechanical arm. to drill and collect rock samples that are slightly larger than a pencil and then loaded into the sample tube. After completing the stone sample collection The Persevia Rennes probe used the Mastcam-Z instrument to photograph the rock samples to determine if the rock samples were actually in the tubes.

Initial images from the Mastcam-Z camera show the tip of the rock sample at the core inside the sample tube. After taking this photo The Persevia Rennes probe has initiated a procedure called “Percuss to Ingest,” which vibrates the drill and pipe five times in a row. to remove any remaining material around the mouth of the tube This process can also allow the sample to slide deeper into the tube.

After the Persevia Rennes completed the Percuss to Ingest process, the Mastcam-Z camera took a second set of photos. In which the images in this set have problems due to low light environments. The resulting image is not yet able to determine the fate of the rock collected. In conclusion… Unable to see that the sample rock is in the tube. until I had to say, ‘Oh, that’s it.

The mission to collect rock samples on Mars this time. The team has set up locations to collect scientifically valuable target rock samples and must ensure they are practical. Persevia will use the Mastcam-Z to re-capture the sample tubes in favorable light conditions by September 3, and send the data back to Earth on September 4.

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