Reveal the secret of great-grandfather, 119 years old, the longest in the world Why do Japanese people live for a hundred years? – Post Today around the world

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Reveal the secret of great-grandfather, 119 years, the longest life in the world. Why do Japanese people live for a hundred years?

On April 26, 2022 at 1:15 p.m.

The oldest Japanese great-grandfather in the world dead But you’re not the first Japanese on the list. “Longest life in the world” What is the Japanese secret to longevity? How to live for 100 years

On April 25, Japan’s Kyodo news agency reported that Kane Tanaka Japanese great-grandmother The oldest person in the world from Fukuoka city Died on April 19 at the age of 119.

Great-grandmother Tanaka Born on January 2, 1903, the same year the Wright brothers succeeded in flying the world’s first aircraft. and a year before the Russo-Japanese War Great-grandmother’s life spanned many eras of the Japanese Empire, including Meiji, Taisho, Showa, Heisei, and Reiwa.

She was recognized by Guinness World Records as the oldest person in the world in March. 2019 at the age of 116 at the time. She was also the oldest person in Japanese history at the age of 117 years 261 days in September. 2020

The great-grandmother gave the reason for her longevity: “Eat delicious food and learn” Her favorites are soda and chocolate. She spent many years in a nursing home in Fukuoka. She enjoys playing board games and other activities.

After the passing of great-grandmother Tanaka The oldest person in the world is Lucila Rongdon, a French nun at 118 years, 73 days, according to the Gerontology Research Group, and Japan’s oldest person is Fusa Tatsumi, 115.

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Why do Japanese people live longer?

According to the article ofDr. Martin Juno French on the Observatoire de la prévention website of the Montreal Institute of Cardiology. Explain why the Japanese have the highest life expectancy in the world.

by pointing out the low incidence of obesity and Japanese food that is conducive to good health like eating fish and plants On the other hand, there is less consumption of red meat. It is scientifically recognized as having great benefits for cardiovascular health.

Previously, in the early 1960s, Japanese life expectancy was the lowest among the G7 countries due to high rates of stroke and cancer deaths. But it is now the highest among G7 due to the consumption of less salt and salty foods. It has also contributed to lower deaths from stroke and stomach cancer.

Dr Martin also pointed out that the higher life expectancy in Japan is largely due to the death rate from ischemic heart disease. myocardial infarction and less Japanese cancer

Compared to Canadians, French, Italians and Americans, Japanese people consume much less red meat. They eat meat (especially beef) as well as dairy products, fats, sugars and sweeteners, but eat more fish, seafood, rice, soy and tea.

Soy, in particular, is an important source of isoflavones. Molecules that have cancer-fighting properties and are beneficial for cardiovascular health. The article points out that Asian isoflavone consumption is linked to a reduced risk of breast and prostate cancer. In addition, Japanese people often drink green tea without sugar, which is beneficial to the body.

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In addition to food Other lifestyles also effective Whether it’s exercise, smoking or other activities. It can be noted that the elderly in Japan tend to gather in various activities. including exercise And many elderly Japanese still work. Which the movement of the body makes the elderly healthy as well

It is also important to note that air quality, hygiene, and Japan also enacts annual health checks for residents.

Photo by Reuters/JAPAN-OLDEST WOMAN/File Photo

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