newsdirectory3

Newsletter

Scientists Discover Brightness of Satellites Hindering Night Sky Observations

Scientists Discover Bright Satellites Hindering Astronomical Observations at Night

[Image Courtesy of 1News, Reproduction and Redistribution Prohibited]

AUCKLAND (Yonhap News) – Groundbreaking research conducted by scientists in New Zealand has unveiled a concerning issue impacting nighttime astronomical observations. It has been revealed that the high brightness levels of the satellites floating in the sky are making it increasingly challenging to study celestial bodies.

According to prominent New Zealand media outlet 1News, researchers from the University of Canterbury have collaborated with international experts over the past 130 days to track the Blue Walker 3 mobile communications satellite. They have found that this particular satellite emits an unusually intense luminosity, posing significant obstacles to astronomical observations.

The Blue Walker 3 satellite, launched into Earth’s orbit in September of last year by American satellite design manufacturer AST Space Mobile, garnered attention for being one of the brightest objects in the night sky shortly after its deployment. Experts observed a sudden surge in brightness after the satellite’s antenna set was activated.

Michelle Bannister, a researcher at the University of Canterbury, emphasized the importance of understanding the impact of man-made structures on the night sky for astronomers and the general public. “Over the past four years, it has become increasingly common to spot satellites in the New Zealand night sky,” Bannister stated. She further highlighted the urgency of evaluating the effects on the night sky caused by the launch of early models of large satellite constellations like Blue Walker 3, considering the multitude of satellites being produced by various companies.

Sangeeta Nandakumar, a researcher at Atacama University in Chile and part of this study, revealed that satellite interference has been a persistent issue for a few years. The researchers also highlighted how the satellite adapter, which secures the satellite to the rocket during launch, seemed to deviate from the maximum brightness recommendations set by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). They emphasized the necessity of conducting impact assessments before the launch of numerous commercial satellites, given the extensive involvement of multiple companies.

In conclusion, this groundbreaking research sheds light on the adverse effects of bright satellites on astronomical observations during night hours. It serves as a call to action to address this issue urgently to safeguard the integrity of our scientific endeavors and preserve the sanctity of the night sky.

koh@yna.co.kr

[Report Via KakaoTalk Okjebo]

[Image Courtesy of 更多代(c) 周年物利, Reproduction and Redistribution Prohibited]
[Sent: October 3, 2023, 07:32]

Execution time2023-10-03 07:32

(Auckland = Yonhap News) Reporter Go Han-seong = Scientists from New Zealand revealed that satellites floating in the sky are so bright that it is difficult to observe astronomical objects at night.

According to New Zealand media outlet 1News on the 3rd, researchers at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand have been tracking the Blue Walker 3 mobile communications satellite with foreign scientists for the past 130 days, and have announced that this satellite is unusually bright, making astronomical. observations are difficult.

Blue Walker 3 Satellite

[1뉴스 사이트 캡처, 재판매 및 DB 금지]

The Blue Walker 3 satellite is an early model of a 5G mobile communications satellite launched into Earth orbit by American satellite design manufacturer AST Space Mobile in September last year.

1News explained that the satellite became one of the brightest objects in the sky immediately after its launch, and that its brightness increased suddenly after the antenna set was deployed.

Michelle Bannister, a researcher at the University of Canterbury, said it was important for astronomers and the public to know how man-made objects affect the night sky. “It has become more and more common to see satellites in the New Zealand night sky overnight. The last four years,” he said.

“We need to know what effect it will have on the sky when we launch an early model of a large constellation of satellites like Blue Walker 3,” he said, noting that many satellites are manufactured by various companies.

Sangeeta Nandakumar, a researcher at Atacama University in Chile who is involved in the study, said, “Satellite interference in astronomy has been a problem for the last few years.”

The researchers said that the satellite adapter, which secures the satellite to the rocket during launch, appeared to have deviated from the maximum brightness recommendations made by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), and stressed that so many companies launching commercial satellites, impact. an assessment must be carried out before launch.

koh@yna.co.kr

Report via KakaoTalk okjebo
< 更多代(c) 周年物利,
Reproduction and redistribution prohibited >
2023/10/03 07:32 Sent

#Zealand #researchers #mobile #communications #satellites #bright #observe #astronomical #objects

Trending