Sleep short bone health can be worse for women

Sleep short bone health can be worse for women

Post-hospital women who report sleeping less than 5 hours per night are more likely to develop low bone mineral density at all major sites and have an increased risk of osteoporosis at the hip and spine, t in accordance with the results published Journal of Bone Research and Minerals.

“Our study suggests that sleep can have a negative impact on bone health, adding to the list of adverse effects of poor sleep on health,” Heather Ochs-Balcom, PhD, An associate professor in the epidemiology and environmental health department at the University at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions at New York State University said in a press statement. “I hope that it will remind us to try and encourage the 7 hours or more sleeping per night for our physical and mental health.”

In a cross-sectional study, Ochs-Balcom and its colleagues analyzed data from 11,084 post-composite women aged between 50 and 79 years at the baseline that participated in the Women's Health Initiative and DXA measurements were carried out in three. clinical center (average age, 63 years;% white). Women performed a hip, spine and full body DX scan and sleeping questionnaires were completed (Insomnia WHI Rating Scale) at the baseline. The use of researchers of adjusted linear reconstructions to examine the combinations of normal sleep duration and sleep quality with site-specific BMD measures, and also used multimedia regression models to assess the connection. between sleep length and quality with low bone mass, T-score is defined between –2.5 to –1, and osteoporosis.

Within the cohort, 10% of women reported sleeping 5 times or less per night and 4.5% reported 9 hours or more per night. Approximately 33% reached the threshold for insomnia.

Osteoporosis consultation with an older woman 2019

Post-hospital women who report sleeping less than 5 hours per night are likely to develop low bone mineral density at all major sites and are at increased risk of osteoporosis at the hip and spine.

Source: Adobe Stock

In adjusted linear regression models, women who reported sleeping 5 times or less per night averaged 0.012 g / cm t2 to 0.018 g / cm2 Lower BMD at all four sites compared to women who reported sleeping 7 times a night. BMD spine and body values ​​were also average 0.01 g / cm2 lower for women who reported sleeping 6 hours per night compared to women who slept 7 hours at night.

In the modified heterogeneous models, low bone mass (OR = 1.22; 95% CI, 1.03-1.45) and hip osteoporosis (HR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.15-2.31) were more likely to be compared to women who slept 7 n -hours per night. Researchers also found a similar pattern for spinal BMD, indicating that patients who slept less than 5 hours per night (adjusted OR = 1.28; 95% CI 1.02-) had higher margins. 1.6) compared to women who slept 7 hours at night.

Societies between sleep quality and BMD, according to the researchers, were not statistically significant.

“The associations have identified us relatively little in terms of BMD measures ongoing when comparing the different categories of sleep duration,” the researchers wrote. “The difference we observed between the group 5 hours per night compared to the reference group was about -0.012 to –0.017 g / cm2, equivalent to one year of aging. ”

The researchers noted that the results provide epidemiological evidence of sleep as a risk factor that is partly transferable to BMD which deserves additional replication.

“Potential studies are needed to assess whether the duration of sleep is associated with the loss of BMD and short-term and long-term effects of unhealthy sleep patterns on the health of the bone. If studies show that sleeping density has a causal link with bone density, sleep promotion interventions could be a way of alleviating bone loss in people at high risk of osteoporosis, ”they wrote. – with Regina Schaffer

Disclosure: One of the authors reports that she received a grant from Merck.

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