Social stress such as age discrimination, adverse effects on immune health and aging-Bravo My Life

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The New York Times reported that long-term social stress ages the immune system, increasing the risk of cancer, heart disease and infectious diseases such as COVID-19.

Dr. Eric Cloppak’s research team at the University of Southern California conducted a survey to find out the correlation between the number of immune cells in the blood and stress among 5,700 Americans over the age of 50. Respondents were asked about their experiences with social stressors such as occupational stress, chronic stress, daily discrimination, and age discrimination. They found that higher levels of stress could age the immune system.

“Some of the associations with immune aging disappeared or decreased when behaviors such as smoking and drinking were controlled,” the research team said. In addition, “Through this study, we can also derive the fact that social stressors such as trauma and discrimination affect life expectancy. However, there are many studies on rejuvenating the immune system, but science is still I couldn’t find a way to go against it. “Once it declines, it is impossible to go back to its former state,” he added.

In other words, in order to prevent the aging of the immune system even a little, it is necessary not to neglect the corresponding efforts, such as blocking stress and improving lifestyle. “Everyone is affected by stress differently, so the way we deal with it can be different,” said Renee Eddie, a New York-based psychotherapist. can,” he advised. This means spending time with your loved ones, enjoying your hobbies, and, if possible, separating yourself from work and social media.

In addition, if you experience social stressors every day, whether at work, social life, or at home, you need to think about how you can control them. For example, if hearing a friend’s political views bothers you, try to identify and control the stressful situation, such as avoiding meeting with that friend. Improving your eating habits is also important. To relieve stress, foods rich in vitamins and minerals, such as vitamins B and C, magnesium and folic acid, which increase serotonin production and lower cortisol levels, can help. Representative stress relief foods recommended by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) include sweet potatoes, spinach, yellow bell peppers, broccoli, almonds, beets, and avocados.

Read Also  Russia dies from COVID-19 The most, more than 700 cases, 1 in 10 infected with the highest in the world.

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