The Fine Arts Boston Museum will apologize for alleged racist behavior towards black students

The Fine Arts Boston Museum will apologize for alleged racist behavior towards black students

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has apologized after it was posted by a teacher in public that it was the secondary school pupils who were the subject of racist behavior during a visit last week.

Marvelyne Lamy, a seventh grade teacher from Davis Leadership Academy in Dorchester, Massachusetts, just outside Boston, posted on the Facebook page on Monday that the school group had an "urgent profile" during a trip to the museum on 14 May. black and brown students completely, she wrote.

"At the beginning of the trip, a member of staff gave an overview of what to expect and told the children that there was no food, drink, and no water," said Lamy, saying the escorts were not. know about the watermelon opinion until after a visit. "During our walk through, we continued to grow. Many of our students grew dissatisfied. At the end, we went through the gender bending demo when the security guard continued our entire movement."

"It was so bad that I started collecting our students so that we could go," she said.

Photo: On Thursday, March 14, 2019, a worker goes into the Gender Bending Fashion exhibition, which is being prepared by the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.AP Photo / Charles Krupa
In this photograph, Thursday, March 14, 2019, a worker enters the "Gender Insulation Fashion" exhibition, which is being prepared by the Fine Art Museum in Boston.

Lamy said that she spoke to the staff when they were leaving, but “they only looked with pity.” T

She said that everything they were offered was a ticket to return to the museum and that they had not received an apology.

The Museum of Fine Arts gave this apology two days after Lamy's post, when he spoke to the incident in a letter to the school, which was placed on the website on Wednesday.

"Last week, some students had a number of challenging and unacceptable experiences on an organized visit which welcomed them," the museum wrote. "That is not who we are or we want to be. Our intention is to set the highest standards, and we are committed to the work it will do to get there."

PHOTO: Cyrus Dallin, an equestrian statue of Cyrus Dallin, sits outside the Fine Art Museum in Boston.Jeff Greenberg / UIG through Getty Images
The equestrian statue by Cyrus Dallin, Appeal to the Great Spirit 1909, is located outside the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

The museum said it immediately arrived at Christopher Coblyn, the school's interim executive director, and apologized directly for the racist behavior.

They signed in the letter, signed by seven officials with the Museum of Fine Arts, to investigate the incident and said that Makeeba McCreary, the Museum's Chief Executive of Learning and Community, is in contact with Coblyn.

"We would like to apologize specifically to the students, to the faculty, and to the Davis Academy of Leadership," said the museum's letter. "We are deeply regretted by any interactions that have resulted from this outcome and we are committed to being a place where everyone feels confident that they feel safe and respected. We look forward to continued dialogue and commitment in this case. be used as an opportunity to create learning and culture that focuses on inclusion. "

Matt News helped Matt Zarrell with this report.

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