Home World The world’s first successful lung transfer transplantation by drone in Canada : Dong-A Science

The world’s first successful lung transfer transplantation by drone in Canada : Dong-A Science

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In Toronto, Canada, living lungs were transported by drone and transplanted into another patient. This is the first time in the world that living organs have been transported by drone. Canada CBC News video capture

In Toronto, Canada, living lungs were transported by drone and transplanted into another patient. This is the first time in the world that living organs have been transported by drone.

CBC News Canada reported on the 13th (local time) that Alain Hodak, a patient with pulmonary fibrosis, is recovering after receiving a pair of lungs that were delivered by a drone across downtown Toronto. This drone departed Toronto Western Hospital where the donor was, and flew about 1.5 km for 6 minutes to arrive on the roof of Toronto General Hospital where Mr. Hordak was waiting.

The lungs were transported by an unmanned drone developed by Health Network University of Canada and Uniter BioElectronics, a Canadian organ transfer drone manufacturer, for organ transfer. Sharp Keshavji, head of the Toronto Lung Transplant Program (thoracic surgeon) at Health Network University, said, “Until now, planes, helicopters, cars and vans have been mobilized to transport organs, but only one jet is used to transport organs weighing only 2 kg. It’s not right to float the whole thing,” he said. “Using drones eliminates the need for airports, runways, airplanes, pilots, etc., and automates all transportation processes,” he said. “It will be an opportunity to change the future of long-term transportation.”

However, in Sangdong, a large city with a dense population, there are many frequencies, so drones can be disturbed and the situation in the city center is also complicated. Keshavji said, “As we succeeded this time in Toronto, Canada’s largest city, it will be possible to use drones for long-term transportation in other large cities.”

The team in charge of Keshavji conducted 53 test flights of the drone between the two hospitals for this project. In addition, a navigation system has been developed so that the drone can fly on the optimal route without any interference. If an engine problem occurs and the drone is no longer able to fly, the cargo is designed to slowly land with a parachute.

Keshavji, head of the department, said, “Once regulations on organ transport using drones are established, it will become commonplace.”

Link to related video https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1961148995954

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