Virginia Scandals give attention to the challenging history of Blackface: NPR

In Virginia, two of the three elected officials throughout the state introduced that they were wearing a few years ago. Although the Ralph Northam Government refused to see it in the racist picture on his page on his medical school bookbook, he admitted to his shoe polish painting while dressing as Michael Jackson on a dance competition in the 1980's. Meanwhile, the Attorney General, Mark Herring, acknowledged that he had a black frame, and wearing college friends as rappers.

These are the headlines that stole the scandals, but the Secretary of State of Florida rescued his clothes as a victim of African-American Katrina, again using a preview. Gucci is the fashion house this week pulled sweater from its physical and online stores, it's like blackface.

African-American negative figures have always been handmade figures, Tom's uncle finals and watermelon postcards. The minstrel caricatures started on toys, games, books, even postcards and daily household items.

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African-American negative figures have always been handmade figures, Tom's uncle finals and watermelon postcards. The minstrel caricatures started on toys, games, books, even postcards and daily household items.

Olivia Sun / NPR

Blackface is around the 1830s, the first time in minstrel shows where the white actors would make black characters.

"They [were] looking black on black in their turnover and privacy inputs and then co-opting and distorting it. There is violence, "says Christy Coleman, CEO of the American Civil War Museum in Richmond.

That view is reverberating throughout Virginia this week, even for the reasons of the state capitol. "Who's so funny?" Kevin Williams, a businessman at home from Fredericksburg, Va. "It's just funny. There's nothing funny about a goddess." He is American-American Williams and says he believed that the elected officials had taken up the scandal.

This week, photos from a modern year came together on social media. Photos of college students were repeated on lynchings and antique cartoons several thousand times on Twitter, and many Americans began to ask, why?

Dwandalyn Reece is the Music Keeper and Ghost Arts at the American-American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

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Dwandalyn Reece is the Music Keeper and Ghost Arts at the American-American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

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"This is the first American theater real," says Gregg Kimball's History at the Virginia Library. Kimball shows that entertainment was popular with the mistral shows. And in cities north and mid-west, not in the Union.

"I grew up in a small town in New Hampshire. When I cleaned my aunt's house, there was a minstrel program there. There was no black man in our home. So it was not like the south. This is an American, "he says.

It was an American laboratory that used the excessive stereotypes of black people. "They are lazy, they are unhappy, they're prone to go, crooks," says Dwandalyn Reece. She is a Music Keeper and Ghost Arts at the African-American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

The objects and figures of blackface caricatures through small, ordinary family exhibitions – many at the expense of a person "exaggerated" cost and enrich one facial features.

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The objects and figures of blackface caricatures through small, ordinary family exhibitions – many at the expense of a person "exaggerated" cost and enrich one facial features.

Olivia Sun / NPR

By the beginning of the century, racist caricatures in vaudeville, and finally radio, television and film were popular. In the action of one comedy called "Two Black Crows," white actors act as indigenous and inactive characters, wearing blackberry, flapous hats and big white lips.

Reece said that a roster of this type of recurring characters could be recognized today: "The figure of the mammals. Jim Jim's figure – Jim Crow's Jump is also". These types came together and came to stand with racism of separation, says Reece.

For many Americans, especially outside the South, these popular images were the only lens to view African Americans. And he had a distortion attitude, says Reece.

National Museum of American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

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National Museum of American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

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The minstrel caricatures started on toys, games, books, even postcards and daily household items. Reece says they had a huge market for them. "You'll really see how it starts to shape people's attitudes around the race and the harm and inclinations that come from that."

The things happening in Virginia, which she puts, do anything in the face of each other and have concrete that they have honest dialogue about the race and the impact of the blackberry.

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